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Guide to Buying Drum Equipment - Drummer Experiences
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Guide to Buying Drum Equipment
Guide to Buying Drum Equipment
Ways to shop smart for drums
Published by Drum Set Connect
06-15-2006
Post Guide to Buying Drum Equipment

As drummers, we have it tough. Out of all the members of the band, who spends the most money on equipment? The guitarist buys a guitar for maybe $1,000 and a pack of strings every now and then for 10 bucks. After this, theyíre pretty much set as long as they donít smash their guitars into expensive amps every gig (stupid). On the other hand, we as drummers must look into high quality drum sets costing $2,000 or more, and thatís just for the shell pack alone. With that, we purchase hardware, thrones, and cymbals, which go for hundreds of dollars apiece. Not only that, but we have to replace heads and drumsticks constantly as we smash into our kits night after night. With all of these large expenses, itís even more important for us to be able to get the best deals for our drumming gear. Of course, being the kings of our respective bands is absolutely priceless, but we might as well lower the price tag associated with this role. Below are some tips to consider when buying drum gear online or in a store. Theyíll really help you to shop smart and get the most for your money.

Buying Online
1. When shopping online, always look around for the best prices.
The Internet has made this process so much easier as all you need to do is click a couple of times. Donít be lazy, the extra savings will be worth it.

2. Before buying, always research the company you are working with.
You can do this at sites like shopping.com or other sites with customer reviews. Just because you find the lowest price does not mean you should automatically do business with this company. You must also take into consideration important factors like customer service and shipping time. For example, you might buy a drum set from a company because they offer the best price, but they may be slow in shipping out your order or your set may be damaged in the process. Make sure you are working with a reputable company.

3. Watch out for hidden costs like shipping and tax.
When buying online, these costs may add up and the cost you actually pay may not be as good as you first assumed. Be extra cautious of this when bidding on eBay auctions for drum gear.

4. Always buy shipping insurance and get delivery confirmation on big orders.
Itís better to be safe than sorry in case of your order getting lost or damaged in transit.

5. For a wide selection of drum products at great prices, check out Musician's Friend

Buying in Stores
1. The main advantage of a brick and mortar store over an online shop is that you can bargain the price down.
Almost all music shops will come down on price or add in some freebies so be prepared to haggle at least a little.

2. Look for some reasons to bring down the price such as insignificant marks on the product, the item being an older model, or anything else you can think of.
It doesnít have to be anything major, just something that will spur on the salesperson to give you a cheaper deal.

3. Try it before you buy it.
A lot of times the same cymbals will sound different even if itís of the same brand and model. Drums may sound different than you had imagined it. Make sure that you look at the exact product that you are going to buy. Try it out and be sure that itís what you want.

4. Always shop around for the best price.
This is the same principle as the online shopping version. If you find a better price, let the other parties know and see if they are willing to match the offer. Bring up some of the internet deals that youíve found as well.

5. Become friends with the salesperson.
Address him or her by name and engage in some small talk. Never argue. Simply put things the way they are and listen to what the salesperson has to say.

6. Be confident and don't waver.
The salesperson will attack you and try to get you to buy something if you seem like you are not sure of yourself or what you want. Establish your confidence early on and demand a few things from the salesperson. Remember that their salary depends on you so they may not always be out for your best interests.

7. Flirt with the salesperson a little or give them some compliments.
This will make them like you and they may give you some special attention. This will lead to added discounts or special offers that otherwise may not have been available to you. This tactic may not make you comfortable at first but it does in fact work.

8. If you are younger, bring an adult with you to help you with some of the money matters.
It will also prevent the salespeople from taking advantage of you. Also, it doesnít hurt to be informed about these money matters before you go into the shop.

9. Also, if you are an inexperienced or beginning drummer, bring someone who knows their drum gear with you.
This will prevent salespeople from selling you bogus things that you do not need and ensure that you get the best value for your money.


Shop for drums and drum products at Musician's Friend
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  #1  
By guss on 04-29-2007, 12:20 PM
You under stand.

For buying Drum equipment I do folow those steps, one thing that helped my in the past and present: Dale Carnege: "Win Friends and Infruince People" yes at 11 years old I did listen to this, and I did help, also: "Stop Worring and Start Living": D C (dont ask) W F a I P, Did yes, say to say thier names, but also make them under stand that you know what thier job is.(Yes Kinzie(Animal control officer), I will keep my dog on the leash when I'm at this park the next time, I know you know my dogs friendly, and I will pay the fee)

Also Buy USED CYMBALS (I cant stress it enough) some sound just as new as when they were first made, for one thing, I go to a "World Class" music store.I only have 3 new cymbals out of nine.

Dont BRING ENOUGH MONEY:My new B8 hi hatsI got for $105s with tax, that sometimes works, but i relly mean BRING ONLY ENOUGH.DONT BUY the $40+tax cowbell, buy the $32+tax one if it sounds just as good. I Buy Cheeper stands, They are great double braced, Well constructed, and every thing i could wish for ($39+tax, insted of $75).
Last edited by guss; 04-29-2007 at 12:35 PM..
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  #2  
By Church Drummer on 04-29-2007, 02:25 PM
Trying before you buy is a definate must do. I recently tested two ride cymbols in a store side by side, same make same model etc and was amazed at the difference in sound between the two. They were a whole step apart!! I definately prefer to do business with a brick and mortar store when possible, for the above reason and for other reasons also, like supporting the local economy. I will take ads from on line retailers and ask how close they can come to the on-line price. I've never had a store yet not agree to match the on-line price.
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  #3  
By givemethebeat on 04-30-2007, 01:34 PM
Remove emotion from purchase. Buy gear that won't devalue and that will last. Save more money to do this. Don't buy a Reference kit if you plan on banging it in and out of vans, cars etc as its not designed for this. In other words think really carefully, research everything and listen to people who know what they are they talking about. Plan ahead as in years ahead. todays crap gear is still tomorrows crap gear. Don't be fooled by marketing, tried and tested is way better value for money.
A little secret is ask to HIRE a drum kit with cymbals. Do this from a reputable pro hire outlet. What are they offering? Chances are it will be decent. In my opinion thats a starting point.
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  #4  
By guss on 04-30-2007, 05:22 PM
Dont be afraid to buy cheeper cymbals and or kit if it sound the same or what you want or if it sounds differint on stage(differint size rooms)I have heard great sounding Pearl and B8 hats and crashes on stage, relly I cant say it enough its not what the price is for the sound you want(relly meaning dont be afraid to say"why spend money on it if you hit it with a stick").
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  #5  
By givemethebeat on 05-02-2007, 12:44 PM
Guss, what you say is true to a point, however as a producer the studio does not lie and pro gear is a must have requirement to obtain a certain level of quality. So its not so much about the price as your have suggested but the sound. The only major problem is unless it is stolen or the seller has no clue, quality costs money.....
Its like guitarists who have fancy marshal amps with goodies as in twin 12" speakers in a combo with digi efx that they paid 1200 bucks for, or the guitarist who has a single 12 inch celestian valve combo with no Efx that was the same purchase price. Please don't try and say that there is no comparison.
It may come down to personal preference in sound at the end, however some education will assist in recognizing sound quality.
Also to clarify a point this is not a personal dig at your post but more of an expansion for the benefit of the community.
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  #6  
By guss on 05-02-2007, 08:50 PM
...

Quote:
Originally Posted by givemethebeat View Post
Guss, what you say is true to a point, however as a producer the studio does not lie and pro gear is a must have requirement to obtain a certain level of quality. So its not so much about the price as your have suggested but the sound. The only major problem is unless it is stolen or the seller has no clue, quality costs money.....
Its like guitarists who have fancy marshal amps with goodies as in twin 12" speakers in a combo with digi efx that they paid 1200 bucks for, or the guitarist who has a single 12 inch celestian valve combo with no Efx that was the same purchase price. Please don't try and say that there is no comparison.
It may come down to personal preference in sound at the end, however some education will assist in recognizing sound quality.
Also to clarify a point this is not a personal dig at your post but more of an expansion for the benefit of the community.

I dont think its the no comparison its just the bad example(The only guitar i can identify is the Warlock, amp Squire practice).

Also pro gear is not for everyone(Death metal drummer using a Sabian HHX Ozone crash, can break faster with the amount of force givin), I just saying there is always the choice to up grade or stay at the lower cymbals,if you want to(or something like that).
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  #7  
By DynaSynergy on 06-30-2011, 03:20 AM
Re: Guide to Buying Drum Equipment

Try cymbals with a variety of drumsticks ( wood tip / nylon tip,etc ) ( 7a , 5a, etc )( maple , hickory, etc )
you would be amazed at the difference the type of stick used would determine the sound quality of the bell & ride sound of whatever cymbal.
Poor sticks makes great cymbals sound bad !
Excellent sticks elicits sonorous sound from great cymbals !
( owner of over 70 plus cymbals from 1960 to 2011 )
godbless !
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