drums drum set drummer
 
Drums resource and community for the online drummer
  The time is now 09:11 AM GMT -4.  
Search Drum Set Connect:
 
 
 
Site Features
Drum Forum
Drum Lessons
Drum Reviews
Drum Kit Photos
Shop
Drum T-Shirts
Premium Membership
Get in Touch
Advertise
Link to us
Contact us
Sponsors
Find Drums


Links
 
Go Back   Drum Forum at Drum Set Connect > Drum Forums - All About Drums > Play the Drums - Drum Talk


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 03-18-2007, 06:01 PM
STNDRUMS's Avatar
STNDRUMS STNDRUMS is offline
Level 6 - Double Stroke Open Roll
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Braidwood, Illinois
Posts: 128
STNDRUMS is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to STNDRUMS

Get a grip.


Traditional grip was the first thing I was taught in band. We constantly had to play like that and didn't switch to matched grip until around 7th grade. I still use both grips today when I practice, but I never use traditional grip when I play on my set.
Reply With Quote

Old Sponsors
Sponsored Links
  #12  
Old 03-18-2007, 06:02 PM
UPSTROKE's Avatar
UPSTROKE UPSTROKE is offline
Level 11 - Ten Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Idaho now
Posts: 342
UPSTROKE is on a distinguished road

You CAN have it both ways


Because I spent so many years playing the traditional grip, I still tend to use
it quite a bit. eg; reaching up to play light strokes on top of crash cymbals,
(as in Steeley Dan intros), some of the light jazz & ghost strokes. (At one point in my early playing days, I developed a kind of wrist snap with my left hand that enables me to do some very fast little double strokes). The traditional grip is certainly not necessary, but is useful at times.
Reply With Quote

  #13  
Old 03-18-2007, 06:16 PM
STNDRUMS's Avatar
STNDRUMS STNDRUMS is offline
Level 6 - Double Stroke Open Roll
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Braidwood, Illinois
Posts: 128
STNDRUMS is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to STNDRUMS

Free form.


Quote:
Originally Posted by UPSTROKE View Post
I developed a kind of wrist snap with my left hand that enables me to do some very fast little double strokes.
I've been working on the moeller technique which I think is what you mentioned above. Bring the stick down while at the same time bringing your wrist up and let it bounce a few times.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhh_K5MGk-E
Reply With Quote

  #14  
Old 03-18-2007, 08:55 PM
UPSTROKE's Avatar
UPSTROKE UPSTROKE is offline
Level 11 - Ten Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Idaho now
Posts: 342
UPSTROKE is on a distinguished road

not quite


Quote:
Originally Posted by STNDRUMS View Post
I've been working on the moeller technique which I think is what you mentioned above. Bring the stick down while at the same time bringing your wrist up and let it bounce a few times.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhh_K5MGk-E
Stndrums; The process that we had started on was just the opening salvo.
The moeller technique and where we left off are miles away yet. It is a very difficult process to explain. It is equally difficult to start out with so many things to be thinking about at the same time. For openers--There is NO multiple bounce at all in the stage we were in, or at any time. That point seems to be very difficult to get across to everyone that attempts to learn this system. It is natural to think the stick is supposed to bounce. After all, isn't that
what we're trying to do?? Answer=NO. It's a long learning process.
Reply With Quote

  #15  
Old 03-18-2007, 09:41 PM
STNDRUMS's Avatar
STNDRUMS STNDRUMS is offline
Level 6 - Double Stroke Open Roll
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Braidwood, Illinois
Posts: 128
STNDRUMS is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to STNDRUMS
Aaaaaahhhhhhh, ok!
Reply With Quote

  #16  
Old 03-27-2007, 09:36 PM
AvengedDrummer's Avatar
AvengedDrummer AvengedDrummer is offline
Level 12 - Eleven Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Newport, NH
Posts: 389
AvengedDrummer is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to AvengedDrummer
Devout trad-gripper here! And i'm one of the young guns! I find that trad grip allows me to play with more feel and finesse, while still being able to haul off and whack the hell out the the snare. (The moeller whip is exceptional for that!) I do use matched though, but I still feel more comfortable in trad. Its good to know both. Tony Williams once said "A drummer who only knows matched grip is like a piano player who says he's going to play, but is only going to use the white keys." ...Or something close to that. Anyway, my two cents. And Tony's.
Reply With Quote

  #17  
Old 03-28-2007, 12:04 AM
UPSTROKE's Avatar
UPSTROKE UPSTROKE is offline
Level 11 - Ten Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Idaho now
Posts: 342
UPSTROKE is on a distinguished road

Uh--ya do this --and --then --this --then --this--and then ---this


AvengedDRUMMER;
A great response. Thank you. As I've said before, I use them both all the time.
I never did actually know the official name of what I was taught by one of my teachers in Seattle many years ago. From what I hear, it sounds like the Moeller grip or an improved version of it. The system that was taught to me, used the traditional grip and was extremely focused on the re-bound as an upstroke in both the downstroke and the rebound stroke of a double stroke roll. Sounds weird but does that make sense at all? Even though the grammar is horrible?
I have a hard time even trying to tell someone what the heck it is that I'm talking about.
Reply With Quote

  #18  
Old 03-28-2007, 06:30 AM
mouse's Avatar
mouse mouse is offline
Level 9 - Seven Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Southland New Zealand
Posts: 234
mouse is on a distinguished road
I never studied stick movement techniques but what i use is playing with downward motions of the stick like throwing something and then energy isn't wasted in upward movements, the ball of the stick (pretend) made of rubber so it bounces back from the head does this work leaving the stick in position for the next downward stroke. Many drummers use an upward motion before striking down which seems a waste of time, why not move the stick starting point up some more for more power and volume and let the stick do the work.
Suppleness in the wrists and using the wrists turned inward so the full movement of the wrist can be used, a whipping type of action sort of sounds like what i do, does that make any sense, whatever, it works for me.
Reply With Quote

  #19  
Old 03-28-2007, 09:48 AM
mind_drummer's Avatar
mind_drummer mind_drummer is offline
Level 7 - Five Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 166
mind_drummer is on a distinguished road
I started with matched grip and I'm now using mostly trad. grip. I found out I was comfy with the movement and it's still very valuable with brushes.

What I do though is working on the movement transition back & forth between match / trad. in the same segment. For jazz, fusion, funk, I like the trad. grip but when it comes to harder stuff then I switch to match. It's funny though because I end up always using trad.
Reply With Quote

  #20  
Old 03-28-2007, 04:07 PM
UPSTROKE's Avatar
UPSTROKE UPSTROKE is offline
Level 11 - Ten Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Idaho now
Posts: 342
UPSTROKE is on a distinguished road

Upstroke, downstroke, two stroke, breast stroke????


Hi mouse; I don't know quite what you're doing. I don't mean that in a negative way at all. I just read your description of your arm movement and decided I
should just go take a pill To clear the confusion in my brain part.
This method that I was taught is completely different than yours. It is a very smooth, relaxing, free flowing method of playing drums. My teacher on this method was 1st chair percussionist for the Seattle Symphony at the time. Believe me when I say that this guy had the finest, smoothest, pair of hands I have ever seen to this day. When you first start, slowly with this system, you kind of look like a Dodo bird trying to flap his wings for tale off in slow motion.
But, when you get up to an actual playing speed, it is so smooth. All of the arm flapping is there because you start out training the muscles clear down in the middle of your back. As your speed increases, your arm and elbow motion decreases. As you work your way down to the forearm and wrist muscles, there is very little arm motion at all. It's like, as the motion decreases, the quality, speed, smoothness, and control increases. It's effortless motion at work.

Last edited by UPSTROKE; 03-28-2007 at 04:13 PM..
Reply With Quote

Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



The time is now 09:11 AM GMT -4.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

 
      Copyright 2007 Teaguy Design. All Rights Reserved.  
 
About Us