drums drum set drummer
 
Drums resource and community for the online drummer
  The time is now 11:58 PM GMT -4.  
Search Drum Set Connect:
 
 
 
Site Features
Drum Forum
Drum Lessons
Drum Reviews
Drum Kit Photos
Shop
Drum T-Shirts
Premium Membership
Get in Touch
Advertise
Link to us
Contact us
Sponsors
Find Drums


Links
 
Go Back   Drum Forum at Drum Set Connect > Drum Forums - All About Drums > Play the Drums - Drum Talk


Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-20-2006, 10:53 AM
gyutae's Avatar
gyutae gyutae is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 650
gyutae is on a distinguished road

Things to look for in a drum teacher


Ok, so next year I'm probaly going to take some drum lessons again just to keep me motivated and to get some guidance on what I should improve and what not.

So my question is this: What are some of the most important things to look for in a drum instructor? I'll start off a list. Add to it if you can think of other things.

1. They have to be better than you.

2. They have to be able to communicate very well, both verbally and on the drums.

3. They should know how to fluently read music.

4. It'd be good if they had been in a band, so they know what it's like and can give you application tips.

5. A similar background between you and the teacher so he or she knows where you're coming from.

6. Someone who cares about your improvement and isn't just after your money.

Ok, i know I missed a bunch so add to the list!

Old Sponsors
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-20-2006, 11:16 AM
AvengedDrummer's Avatar
AvengedDrummer AvengedDrummer is offline
Level 12 - Eleven Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Newport, NH
Posts: 389
AvengedDrummer is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to AvengedDrummer
7. They should know their rudiments!

8. They should have PRO gear for you to learn on....not Pulse kits or something.

9. They should teach you, not show off.

10. They should be able to play a wide range of musical styles.

  #3  
Old 06-20-2006, 04:03 PM
gyutae's Avatar
gyutae gyutae is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 650
gyutae is on a distinguished road
Great additions!

Only thing I disagree with is #8. The first teacher I had was great but the music shop where we had the lessons had CB drums I think. They sure were crappy - crappy drums, hardware, cymbals and everything, but he was still able to make them sound good and teach me some good stuff.

Of course, it'd be great to have pro gear... but that could spoil a beginner trying to learn the basics.

  #4  
Old 06-20-2006, 04:05 PM
AvengedDrummer's Avatar
AvengedDrummer AvengedDrummer is offline
Level 12 - Eleven Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Newport, NH
Posts: 389
AvengedDrummer is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to AvengedDrummer
Yeah, there are a couple exceptions. I know I would be hesitant though If I walked in for a lesson and saw the teacher had pearl cymbals!

  #5  
Old 06-20-2006, 04:09 PM
gyutae's Avatar
gyutae gyutae is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 650
gyutae is on a distinguished road
What's wrong with Pearl cymbals?? lol

  #6  
Old 06-23-2006, 07:56 PM
econwriter5's Avatar
econwriter5 econwriter5 is offline
Level 2 - Single Stroke Four
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 16
econwriter5 is on a distinguished road
I confess, my first drum kit (and still only drum kit) is a Pearl Forum series that came with Pearl cymbals that I used until I bought Zildjian ZBTs off eBay. I was in college, what can I say? I have since upgraded to Zildjian K-Customs and damn does my kit sound like a real kit!

These tips are awesome. Since I've moved back to Chicago I've been looking for a good drum instructor, someone to really help me improve as playing long to my favorite songs only gets me so far and undoubtly is teaching me some bad habits.

I'd add to the list that the teacher should be personable, someone with whom you connect and get. Things just click.

  #7  
Old 06-24-2006, 07:53 AM
full metal's Avatar
full metal full metal is offline
Level 13 - Thirteen Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 477
full metal is on a distinguished road
Well first off I dont think that they always have to be better than you because your instructer might have a whole diffrent thought proces than you and can brake down things and show you a diffrent way of looking at things.

and I think one of the number one things to look for in an teacher is someone that has a wide range of music that they can teach like jazz to rock and everything in betwen, I know that if I had a student come to me and say I want to learn about jazz and country music I would have to turn them away because I very much suck at both f those and would have a very hard time to teach them, And yes I think that country music has its on style of playing drums.

  #8  
Old 06-25-2006, 01:34 PM
econwriter5's Avatar
econwriter5 econwriter5 is offline
Level 2 - Single Stroke Four
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 16
econwriter5 is on a distinguished road
I agree, full metal, that country music does have its own style of drums. I actullay find country music drums harder to figure out by listening than I do rock, metal or punk. It's so simple yet complex and delicate, if that makes any sense, the drumset itself isn't always a typical drumset.

  #9  
Old 06-25-2006, 03:15 PM
gyutae's Avatar
gyutae gyutae is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 650
gyutae is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by full metal
Well first off I dont think that they always have to be better than you because your instructer might have a whole diffrent thought proces than you and can brake down things and show you a diffrent way of looking at things.
I agree with this statement to some extent but I think it only applies for advanced players. If the teacher wasn't better than a beginning student then what would motivate the student to take lessons from him/her? The teacher has to lead by example and show the student how things are done. The teacher always is better at something than the student, otherwise the relationship wouldn't exist.

However, for more advanced players, a student could be better than the teacher technically but might look to the teacher or coach for constructive criticism or a different perspective. Take for example, a boxer. A boxer could probaly knock out his trainer or coach with one punch and yet he still looks to the trainer for advice. Why? Because the trainer knows what it's like and can see a different view that the boxer might overcome.

  #10  
Old 06-26-2006, 08:24 AM
full metal's Avatar
full metal full metal is offline
Level 13 - Thirteen Stroke Roll
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 477
full metal is on a distinguished road
Yea but some of the best on the spot how did you do that lessons Ive ever had were from drumers that I know I can play a lot than but yet some people like that will have a complex way of putting simple things into music that you would never even think of, if you understand what im saying, it's hard to explain.
Maby someone else on here will understand my jibberish and translate for me.

Closed Thread


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads for: Things to look for in a drum teacher
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to become a drum teacher Larry Play the Drums - Drum Talk 21 12-09-2014 10:16 AM


The time is now 11:58 PM GMT -4.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

 
      Copyright 2007 Teaguy Design. All Rights Reserved.  
 
About Us